Living with Chickens 2013…

I over heard a woman at the Farmers market say…”Chickens, they’re a gateway animal to farm life!”

I started raising Chickens  in the Spring of 2013.

I moved and had to start over…building my second coop.

H.R 5059

Right now 22 American Veterans are contemplating their last days on this small planet. They gave up their freedom, time, personal ideals so they could in their beliefs, ‘defend’ our country. Now, pressed from service, thousands upon thousands (2.5 Million since 2001 have been to Iraq) of sailors, marines, soldiers and airmen are returning home with a sense of loss, survivors guilt and shame. Many have families and loved one who offer ears of support, but their shoulders are NOT strong enough to carry the burdens of war seen.combat
This Clay Hunt act would give Military members faster and better access to the health care they already served to deserve. Days, weeks and even months can go by before a veteran has an evaluation.
This act also gives veterans going or currently attending school for  (see act for list) mental health a chance to participate in the pilot program as official Health Care services for returning military members.crisis

Therapy Horses a Calming Influence on Veterans

Horses have the largest EMP heart aura in land mammals. They can be registered at 200 -500 feet away from the Horse. Some owners have told me they can feel their horse when they’re far away. So it doesn’t surprise me to read that veterans especially are doing so well with their Equine therapist. I will always prefer the company of a horse, to that of a person.

Straight from the Horse's Heart

By Brian MacQuarrie | Globe Staff

In Norfolk, female veterans find strength through learning to ride and care for horses

Veteran Eadyie Davis of Marlborough shared a quiet moment with therapy horse Creek. ~ Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff Veteran Eadyie Davis of Marlborough shared a quiet moment with therapy horse Creek. ~ Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

NORFOLK — Feet in the stirrups, hands on the reins, Karen Souza closes her eyes as a quarter horse named Rio carries her to a tranquil, peaceful place she has rarely visited.

Souza spent decades walled off emotionally after being sexually abused as a teenage soldier. She never formed a loving relationship, and she spoke only sparingly. But from that dark, bleak world, she has emerged to find a place of trust, and accomplishment, and the simple joy of working with a large, strong, patient animal.

Souza is one of several female veterans who exhale and relax once a week at the BINA Farm Center, where they learn basic horsemanship and riding skills…

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Flow the HEN.

Flow
Flow the Rock Plymouth Hen. The Boss.

Farmageddon

Urban Organic Farming 101

Charity Farm March-0714
Organic lettuce

Farming is much more work than folks think. At least in the beginning it can be back breaking, tiring, full filling, exhausting and empowering all at the same time. Most folks don’t give it enough of a try, they have a few crop failures and they throw in the trowel and head back to the supermarket and become another cog in the machine of industry.

Gibson Houseboat Flwr garden
Gibson, British Columbia

But for those industrious enough, with gritt, no respect for failure and a drive to push, push push…will have the ultimate satisfaction of watching much ado about everything sprout from their yards, buckets, pots, planters fields, roof tops and house boats. (In Gibson British Columbia there is an entire section of house boat dedicated to gardens.)

To have the ability to create food from nothing, is a bit of deity defining moment in ones ego.

Once you get past the awesome feeling of god like powers, your humility kicks in as mother nature takes over leaving you to tend to the dirty work:

The planting, the weeding, watering, removing pest, harvest and tilling.

In may I will be sharing the stories of three individuals who rolled up their sleeves and answered the kitty gritty call of self sustainability. I want to shed light on their success and failures, showing that anyone, with the right attitude can change their lives and inexplicably that of their community and world.

 

Seed Hoarding.

corn-colorsI have amassed a modest stock of seeds for my farmers ark. I’m always on the look out for rare and peculiar breeds of corn. Today I picked up several packets of jeweled corn and a very lusty looking 160 yr old heirloom sweet corn. ( My Grandpa would be proud)

I LOVE corn, I LOVE tortilla made from fresh maze with the tiniest bit of lime and salt, the crunch of popcorn against my teeth as I enjoy another good book.

I wasted no time, jumped on to their site, read about their mission and desires to share some amazing rare and endangered seeds with small and big farmers alike and ordered my share!

SeedWatch

Check out the Seed Watch icon to head to Native Seeds home site.

 

 

 

Chickens…

Still waiting…

Between battling the city and their ever ongoing incompetence at identifying their own property lines…departments…botanist from biologist. I’m still waiting on my darlings to hatch.

 

Silkies as I’ve read take up 25-28 days to hatch. I’m at day 24, I even broke out my stethoscope to see if I could hear a heart beep, a pip…ANYTHING!

 

Nada. So now I stand on chick watch waiting patiently for my new friends.

So if you’re waiting on your chickens…here is a great blog I found!

http://successwithpoultry.blogspot.com/

 

Eggs,Hens clucking oh my.

Hola, Me llamo Silkie.

Salsa Silkie
Salsa Silkie

Meet the Silkie,  sweet egg laying little hen that loves to be cuddled by people.

(My sister’s South Western flare on a Japanese Chicken.)

I’m getting my very first clutch of eggs today. And I’ve been doing a lot of prep work before I bring these egg-lets to their new roost.

I’ve raised parrots, Budgies, ducks and pigeons so I figured I’d give chickens a crack. What have I learned in my preparation? Like a garden you need to do your planning before you plant.

Step one: Read, read and read some more on chickens. My site of choice has been BACKYARD CHICKENS.

Step two: Start gathering your supplies.

  • 1 styrofoam cooler (You can use a plastic one if you are willing to cut holes in it.
  • 1 typical wall picture frame with glass or plastic
  • 1 25 watt lightbulb
  • 1 lamp or light that the bulb fits into
  • roll of duct tape
  • a digital thermometer and humidity reader. Can be bought at walmart for 8 dollars
  • a small bowl and sponge for water
  • Some chicken or fence wire. The type with 1/4 inch squares is perfect (optional)
10 Silkie Egglets
10 Silkie Egglets

Step three:  Locate a good source of fertile local eggs. 

Step four :   Get your eggs home and safe in their new nest. Now you will be turning these little lovelies three times a day for 18 days. :}

Age of Poultry (feathered) Chick Degrees in
Fahrenheit
1st Week 90 – 95*1
2nd Week 85 – 90
3rd Week 80 – 85
4th Week 75 – 80
5th Week 70 – 75
6th Week + 70*2

Here is a basic temp chart to help you out.

As I go along I’ll post and update pictures of the incubator, brooder and their coop with scratching ‘patio’.